PL EN


2017 | 16 |
Article title

Osoby niepełnosprawne w sytuacji podwójnego wykluczenia w wybranych krajach Afryki Południowej

Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
Education plays an important role in South African countries with respect to the emergence of double exclusion that affects people with disabilities living there. Factors like race, gender, social origin or disability contribute to social inequalities, whereas their intensity depends on the dominant ideology or state policy (e.g. apartheid in South Africa). People with disabilities who experience social exclusion caused by their social origin as African natives simultaneously undergo exclusion resulting from their disability. In this context, apart from (the exclusion rooted in) the “heritage” of apartheid, one can also find other very meaningful factors including folk beliefs, healers and shamans. Hence, in line with local folk beliefs, disability in specific areas of the country is perceived and understood as a punishment or a charm that was cast, which eventually makes families ashamed of their disabled children or relatives, force them to hide them for fear of ostracism, violence, ritualmutilation or death.
PL
In South African countries education plays the important role in the context of double exclusion occurance of people with disabilities living in those areas. Factors like race, gender, social origin or disability affect social inequalities which powerful strength in society is strictly connected with a dominant ideology or state policy (eg. apartheid in South Africa). People with disabilities undergoing social exclusion caused by their social origin as African natives, simultaneously undergo exclusion caused by disability. In this context, apart from (the exclusion rooted in) the “heritage” of apartheid, one can also find a very meaningful factor folk beliefs, healers and shamans. Hence, disability, according to the particular area of the country and local folk beliefs, is perceived and understood as punishment or a thrown charm which eventually makes families being ashamed of their disabled children or relatives, force them to hide them for fear of ostracism, violence, ritual mutilation or death.
Year
Issue
16
Physical description
Dates
published
2017
online
2018-09-09
Contributors
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.ojs-doi-10_14746_ikps_2017_16_13
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