PL EN


2014 | 31 |
Article title

Koreański szamanizm – religia pojednania i współistnienia

Authors
Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
This article is to explain the basic rules of Korean shamanism. First the religious views of Koreans are presented. The importance of harmony in the lives of Koreans is highlighted. It is stressed that the concepts of Confucianism, Buddhism and Taoism do not exclude one another, do not erect barriers and they promote mutual tolerance and are intertwined in Korea. Next, the role of Korean shamanism in helping common people solve their problems are discussed. Korean shamanism is one of the best examples of unorganized religions and possesses features typical of such religions. Shamanism has a well-formulated system of beliefs as well as behaviours and conduct but its practices and its canons are not well-organized. Consequently, shamanism plays a latent function in society similarly as systems of values, morals, manners and emotions. The author also describes the shamanic ritual called gut. Finally, the contemporary views on and approaches to Korean shamanism are touched upon.
PL
This article is to explain the basic rules of Korean shamanism. First the religious views of Koreans are presented. The importance of harmony in the lives of Koreans is highlighted. It is stressed that the concepts of Confucianism, Buddhism and Taoism do not exclude one another, do not erect barriers and they promote mutual tolerance and are intertwined in Korea. Next, the role of Korean shamanism in helping common people solve their problems are discussed. Korean shamanism is one of the best examples of unorganized religions and possesses features typical of such religions. Shamanism has a well-formulated system of beliefs as well as behaviours and conduct but its practices and its canons are not well-organized. Consequently, shamanism plays a latent function in society similarly as systems of values, morals, manners and emotions. The author also describes the shamanic ritual called gut. Finally, the contemporary views on and approaches to Korean shamanism are touched upon.
Year
Issue
31
Physical description
Dates
published
2014
online
2014-01-01
Contributors
author
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.ojs-doi-10_14746_il_2014_31_4
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