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2019 | 43 | 3 |
Article title

Reading as a core component of developing academic literacy skills in L2 settings

Authors
Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
Academic reading has gained considerable interest among language theoreticians and practitioners as a key component of generally understood academic literacy competencies. Yet, despite the unquestionable importance of developing advanced reading skills in both L1 and L2 academic settings, a definition of the concept of academic reading is still not easy to formulate. In an attempt to better understand the notion of academic reading, this article first, provides an overview of the goals of academic reading comprehension, with special focus on reading to learn, and then, discusses the relationship of academic reading to other concepts currently employed with reference to academic literacy. The article finishes with some guidelines for L2 reading instruction developed at the academic level.
DE
Der Band enthält die Abstracts ausschließlich in englischer Sprache.
FR
L'article contient uniquement les résumés en anglais.
Year
Volume
43
Issue
3
Physical description
Dates
published
2019
online
2019-11-14
Contributors
author
References
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Document Type
Publication order reference
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.ojs-doi-10_17951_lsmll_2019_43_3_89-98
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