PL EN


Journal
2009 | 11 | 1-2 |
Article title

„Urbes laudandi ratio”. Antyczna teoria pochwały miast i jej recepcja w De Inv entione et amp lific ation e or atori a Gerarda Bucoldianusa oraz w Esserci tii di Af tonio Sofi sta Orazia Toscanelli

Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
PL
Abstracts
PL
The first praises of cities appear as early as in the archaic Greek poetry of Homer, Pindar, Solon and others, but the first praises of cities as an independent literary genre seem to be two speeches of Aelius Aristides (2nd century AD ): Panathenaikos and Encomium to Rome. The main ancient source of the theory of praise of cities is the treatise On Epideictic attributed to Menander Rhetor (late 3rd century AD ). Since Quintilian and Priscian pay only very little attention to the topoi of urban encomium, Menander’s theory seems to be the most important source also for such humanistic treatises on rhetoric as De inventione et amplificatione oratoria by Gerardus Bucoldianus and Essercitii di Aftonio Sofista by Orazio Toscanella.The aim of this article is to examine the classification of the praises of cities in Menander’s treatise On Epideictic, its reception in the 16th-century works of Bucoldianus and Toscanella and the relationships between these Renaissance texts. The examination of the theory of the urban encomium in these rhetorical treatises enables us to claim that chapters about the praise of cities in De inventione et amplificatione oratoria by Bucoldianus, incorporated in 1542 into Reinhard Lorich’s Scholia to Aphthonius and reedited with them more than 150 times, influenced other Renaissance theorists, including Toscanella
Keywords
PL
 
Journal
Year
Volume
11
Issue
1-2
Physical description
Dates
published
2009
online
2009-01-25
Contributors
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.ojs-issn-2084-3844-year-2009-volume-11-issue-1-2-article-4665
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