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2014 | 141 | 4 |
Article title

Problem dezercji w polityce władz Skonfederowanych Stanów Ameryki (1861–1865)

Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
PL
Abstracts
PL
The problem of desertion in the policy of the Confederate States of America (1861-1865)In this article I intend to focus on the presentation of how desertion was perceived in those times, and in particular, to trace the policies of the Confederacy relating to the growing number of desertions. During the Civil War in America, a soldier who walked away from his own unit without permission and intention to return was regarded as a deserter. On the other hand, the status of soldiers was enjoyed by all officers and soldiers who received a soldier’s pay or were duly enlisted in the service of the Confederate States. From the middle of 1862, efforts were made to solve the problem of desertion from the Confederate Army. Either amnesties were introduced or deserters were threatened with possible use of severe penalties. The policy on desertion was influenced to the greatest extent by: the CSA President Jefferson Davis, General Robert E. Lee, Secretary of War James A. Seddon and the Head of the Conscription Bureau, Brigadier General John S. Preston. The southern authorities’ policy with respect to the problem of desertion was chaotic and inefficient. According to various estimates, during the war, at least one fourth of all Confederate soldiers deserted from the army
Year
Volume
141
Issue
4
Physical description
Dates
published
2014
online
2014-12-14
Contributors
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.ojs-issn-2084-4069-year-2014-volume-141-issue-4-article-5361
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