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2016 | 49 | 283-294
Article title

Memory and storytelling in Iain Banks’s “Use of weapons”

Content
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
The aim of this paper is to use cognitive approach in order to discuss the topic of memory in Iain Banks’s “Use of weapons.” I argue that Banks presents memory as a creative faculty of the human brain which is inherently connected with imagination, identity-shaping processes and narrative construction. In this essay, I analyse the workings of memory, as well as its social and cultural functions, as presented in “Use of weapons.”
Year
Issue
49
Pages
283-294
Physical description
Contributors
  • Uniwersytet Warszawski
References
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Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.desklight-45aa224a-44de-4850-878c-f288a52d2e1d
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