PL EN


2010 | 15 | 2 | 355-365
Article title

Philosophical Implications of Naturalizing Religion

Authors
Selected contents from this journal
Title variants
Languages of publication
EN
Abstracts
EN
This paper deals with Daniel Dennett’s argument regarding the nature of belief in contrast to belief in belief. The idea that the value of the first order belief in the existence of a precept is entirely irrelevant because it is indistinguishable from the second-order belief; that the belief in something is a good thing. That is to say it doesn’t matter if I believe something inasmuch as if I believe that the belief is a good thing (i.e.: beneficial to the individual, etc). Dennett’s approach particularly regards an analysis of religion from this point, and suggests that it is entirely impossible to determine if an individual believes in God, or simply believes that the belief in God is a good thing. More importantly, Dennett argues that the individual themselves cannot make this distinction.
Keywords
Year
Volume
15
Issue
2
Pages
355-365
Physical description
Dates
published
2010
Contributors
  • University of Tampa
References
  • Dennett, Daniel. Breaking the Spell: Religion As a Natural Phenomenon. New York: Viking, 2006.
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
URI
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=54527572&lang=pl&site=ehost-live
URI
http://www.pdcnet.org/pdc/bvdb.nsf/purchase?openform&fp=forphil&id=forphil_2010_0015_0002_0355_0365
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.desklight-b21b86d0-d379-48ce-8158-30020fe342ea
JavaScript is turned off in your web browser. Turn it on to take full advantage of this site, then refresh the page.