PL EN


Journal
2013 | 3 | 129-142
Article title

Déformer le réel, un mode de représentation de la ligne de couleur, du genre et des subalternités dans un roman mauricien et un roman réunionnais

Content
Title variants
EN
Deform reality, a mode of representation color line, gender and subalternity in mauritian and reunionese novels.
PL
Déformer le réel, un mode de représentation de la ligne de couleur, du genre et des subalternités dans un roman mauricien et un roman réunionnais
Languages of publication
FR
Abstracts
EN
Moi, l’interdite written by the Mauritian Ananda Devi and Femme sept peaux, written by the Reunionese Monique Séverin represent in original manner subalternities due to color line and gender in hierarchy colonial discourse. These novels stage female narrator’s “agency” as a ghost and as a werewolf. The ghost Mrs Joseph changes other female Black character’s colonial ideology. So she obtains the discourse of power, the discourse of knowledge in the creole songs. In narrative Moi, l’interdite, Indian narrator mixes several type of narrative, diary, werewolf legend and tale in order to represent her subalternity, her monstrosity. She inverts the orientalist vision and presents another face of Indian woman in Mauritius Island. Consequently, these texts account for complexities in postcolonial realities as concerned the women black, indian, creole, chinese and metis subaltern.
PL
Moi, l’interdite written by the Mauritian Ananda Devi and Femme sept peaux, written by the Reunionese Monique Séverin represent in original manner subalternities due to color line and gender in hierarchy colonial discourse. These novels stage female narrator’s “agency” as a ghost and as a werewolf. The ghost Mrs Joseph changes other female Black character’s colonial ideology. So she obtains the discourse of power, the discourse of knowledge in the creole songs. In narrative Moi, l’interdite, Indian narrator mixes several type of narrative, diary, werewolf legend and tale in order to represent her subalternity, her monstrosity. She inverts the orientalist vision and presents another face of Indian woman in Mauritius Island. Consequently, these texts account for complexities in postcolonial realities as concerned the women black, indian, creole, chinese and metis subaltern.
Keywords
Journal
Year
Issue
3
Pages
129-142
Physical description
Dates
published
2013-06-01
Contributors
References
Document Type
Publication order reference
Identifiers
YADDA identifier
bwmeta1.element.ojs-issn-2353-8953-year-2013-issue-3-article-1172
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